Specious scholar offers spin about Davidians

CultNews.com/March 20, 2003
By Rick Ross

Catherine Wessinger, a religious studies professor that has been called a "cult apologist," offers her analysis of another so-called "new religious movement."

This time it's David Koresh's Branch Davidians.

It seems Wessinger can be depended upon for an apology no matter how bizarre and/or destructive the cult.

Today in the Waco Tribune-Herald's second installment of its nine part series about the Branch Davidians she once again offers her unique spin on a cult's demise.

What does Wessinger make out of the Davidian cult tragedy?

Well, she says it was largely about "the militarization of law enforcement and the problems ... and abuse that arise from such militarization."


Apparently this college professor doesn't wish to acknowledge the implications of a purported "psychopath" leading a cult group.

Wessinger admits, "I'm not trained in psychology so I don't articulate those opinions...I'm sure he [Koresh] had some psychological issues."

What an understatement.

Wessinger offers her usual apologetic spin. She has previously attempted to explain away cult tragedies such as Heaven's Gate and Jonestown.

Wessinger once said, "If Jones and his community had succeeded in creating their Promised Land, they would still be here. But due to the attacks and investigations they endured, they opted for the Gnostic view that devalued this world."

Again, no meaningful blame is placed upon the deeply disturbed cult leader and the inherent destructive dynamics of his control over the group.

Apparently almost any cult and/or cult leader's behavior may be largely excused according to Wessinger's reasoning under the general heading of "persecution."

The professor's new book is titled "Millennialism, Persecution and Violence: Historical Cases (Religion and Politics)."

Wessinger's conclusions about the Branch Davidians within this context come as no surprise.

The supposed scholar says, "Koresh would have emerged from the compound peacefully, as promised, once he completed his work inside interpreting the Seven Seals in the Book of Revelation. To have come out earlier, she says, "might have compromised Koresh's need to conform to strict biblical prophecy."

Obviously such a conclusion strains credulity and ignores the facts.

Koresh broke the law, failed to comply with a warrant, murdered federal officers and then refused to surrender for 51 days, despite the repeated pleas and guarantees of law enforcement. In the end he chose instead to kill himself and all his followers within the compound.

The cult leader's behavior had little if anything to do with "biblical prophecy" and his "work" was really more about criminal violations of gun laws and sexual abuse than the "Book of Revelation."

However, "apologists" like Wessinger apparently ignore such facts in favor of speculation based upon specious, but supposedly "politically correct" views, instead of reality.


Copyright © 2003 Rick Ross.

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